Umbilical hernia in an adult

Duration: 5min 35sec Views: 1873 Submitted: 17.07.2020
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There is a separate factsheet available for parents of children having surgery to repair an umbilical hernia - Umbilical hernia in children. Your care will be adapted to meet your individual needs and may differ from what is described here. So it's important that you follow your surgeon's advice. An umbilical hernia is a result of weakness in the muscles in or around your belly button. It causes the belly button to pop outwards and can happen at any age. Umbilical hernias are most common in women during and after pregnancy, and in people who are overweight.

Umbilical Hernias in Adults: Epidemiology, Diagnosis and Treatment

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The umbilical cord connects a mother and her fetus while in the womb. In most cases, the hole closes soon after birth. About 20 percent of babies are born with an umbilical hernia. About 90 percent of umbilical hernias will eventually close on their own, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine. An umbilical hernia occurs when the opening in the abdominal muscle that allows the umbilical cord to pass through fails to close completely. Umbilical hernias are most common in babies, but they can also occur in adults. African-American babies, premature babies , and babies born at a low birth weight are at an even higher risk of developing an umbilical hernia.

Umbilical hernia

An umbilical hernia creates a soft swelling or bulge near the navel. It occurs when part of the intestine protrudes through the umbilical opening in the abdominal muscles. Umbilical hernias in children are usually painless. An umbilical hernia occurs when part of your intestine bulges through the opening in your abdominal muscles near your bellybutton navel.
An umbilical hernia occurs when part of the bowel or fatty tissue pokes through an area near the belly button, pushing through a weak spot in the surrounding abdominal wall. There are different types of hernia. According to an article in The BMJ , a true umbilical hernia happens when there is a defect in the anterior abdominal wall that underlies the umbilicus, or navel.